The Lamb

     Little Lamb, who made thee
     Dost thou know who made thee,
   Gave thee life, and bid thee feed
   By the stream and o’er the mead;
   Gave thee clothing of delight,
   Softest clothing, woolly, bright;
   Gave thee such a tender voice,
   Making all the vales rejoice?
     Little Lamb, who made thee?
     Dost thou know who made thee?


     Little Lamb, I’ll tell thee;
     Little Lamb, I’ll tell thee:
   He is called by thy name,
   For He calls Himself a Lamb
   He is meek, and He is mild,
   He became a little child.
   I a child, and thou a lamb,
   We are called by His name.
     Little Lamb, God bless thee!
     Little Lamb, God bless thee!

–William Blake

A Rain Day

It pools in the garden
and trickles down the driveway
drowning up earthworms
dripping from window frames

A bike in a puddle
near a baseball in the mud
Yesterday’s playground
turns to today’s flood

The young one peers
through the curtains and the trees
longing for a sunny day
for riding bikes and skinning knees

An ocean is drier
than this soggy morning,
the young one ponders,
as water keeps pouring

Hey there, kiddo,
Mother soothes,
Want your galoshes,
and your raincoat, too?

–Albert L Swope

The Gardener

The gardener does not love to talk,
He makes and keeps the gravel walk;
And when he puts his tools away,
He locks the door and takes the key.


Away behind the currant row
Where no one else but cook may go,
Far in the plots, I see him dig,
Old and serious, brown and big.


He digs the flowers, green, red, and blue,
Nor wishes to be spoken to.
He digs the flowers and cuts the hay,
And never seems to want to play.


Silly gardener! summer goes,
And winter comes with pinching toes,
When in the garden bare and brown
You must lay your barrow down.


Well now, and while the summer stays,
To profit by these garden days
O how much wiser you would be
To play at Indian wars with me!

— A Child’s Garden of Verses, by Robert Louis Stevenson

The Rainbow

Triumphal arch, that fills the sky
When storms prepare to part,
I ask not proud Philosophy
To teach me what thou art.
Still seem, as to my childhood’s sight,
A midway station given,
For happy spirits to alight,
Betwixt the earth and heaven.


— Thomas Campbell

Trees

     I think that I shall never see
     A poem lovely as a tree.    

A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
     Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast;

     A tree that looks at God all day,
     And lifts her leafy arms to pray;

     A tree that may in Summer wear
     A nest of robins in her hair;

     Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
     Who intimately lives with rain.

     Poems are made by fools like me,
     But only God can make a tree.

— Joyce Kilmer

The Days of the Month

A short poem from a book of poems called “POEMS: Every Child Should Know” by “The What-Every-Child-Should-Know-Library”.  This is a song and memory aid for children, which I remember from my youth and which I thought was still useful today.

Thirty days hath September,

April, June, and November;

February has twenty-eight alone.

All the rest have thirty-one,

Excepting leap-year—that’s the time

When February’s days are twenty-nine.


–By anonymous

How using quotes can help your writing?

Quotes are often an underutilized writing opportunity.  Adding quotes, and I don’t mean just a few spackle on random pages throughout your writing, can be very beneficial to writers in a number of ways. quotes can also help you convey your meeting, grab readers attention, and communicate your message better. So, here are just a few thoughts on how quotes can help you achieve your writing goals.

Using quotes can help with your use of Tactful repetition

An on topic quote can give you another communication point about the subject that you are discussing, thereby, providing another mental reference to reinforce your subject.

If done with care, you can also get more than one use out of a quote. You can use a quote in the sentence of your paragraph, but this also doesn’t preclude you from isolating it and using other tactics listed below to present it more than once, to make it stand out, and to make it visually impactful.

Also, when quotes are properly placed and made distinct enough, garner the attention of readers who are using skimming and skinny techniques to acquaint themselves or to refresh themselves with the information that they are reading.

Use of quotes can add Volume to your writing

Quotes or an easy way to add value and to expand the volume of your writing. This this is especially true when writing about nonfiction topics.

Sometimes when writing you have a target word count that you’re trying to achieve or document length. If you’ve done your research ahead of time and collect your quotes , then you should be able to add a few short, on topic, non-distracting quotes, which will increase the total word count of your document and the total page count of your document.

If you’re flexible in your approached including quotes in your writing, then you will have several opportunities to make your quotes stand out and to better convey your message.

Isolation

Isolating your Quotes within your document can make it easier to distinguish and add emphasis to the quote but it also adds whitespace before and after the quote and citation. Depending on how you formatted your quote and citation, you may also add one line or two between the actual quote and the citation.

Isolation of your quote not only adds white space, it makes your quote more visually impactful. If a quote is by itself, rather than buried in a paragraph, the reader will notice the quote and read the quote without the distraction of surrounding words.

Italicising

In addition to isolation or rather than isolation, you can bold and or italicize your quotes, so, that they are more visually prominent within the text of your paragraph.

Highlighting or background Shading

Highlighting the quote or shading background surrounding the quote can both be visually effective methods to make the quote stand out, be more recognizable, and potentially cause the reader to pay more attention to the quote and read the quote.

Including the quote in a picture or a graphic

Using a graphic or a picture with your quote included in it is another way to make a quote graphically stand out within your document and to be eye-catching. The trick here is that the graphic or picture must be directly related to the quote, your topic, and it must not be too big and distracting in nature. you need the picture or graphic to appeal to the reader, to catch the reader’s attention, and to focus and reinforce the reads thinking.

Quotes Assist in communicating expertise and background knowledge

Using quotes when pertinent to the topic you are writing about and from a variety of sources, can demonstrate that you have thought about and researched the subject about which your writing. This particularly true, when the quote come from all of variety of authoritative sources which have been properly cited and not just from a web search.

Conclusion

I’m sure there are more ways in which quotes can be put to use full effect in writing, but this primer should be a helpful start.

Easy tips For getting more from reading

the general Reading for Comprehension Process

  • Choose what you read — this a high speed filtering process
  • Read according to the reading material type – fiction and nonfiction are not read at the same speed or purpose
  • Preview the reading material/book
  • Read with Intent

Choose what you read.

…Our new times call for new ways of searching for, filtering, consuming, and applying knowledge in order to improve our lives. — Michael Simmons

This would be seem to be an obvious thing, but not all reading materials are equally valuable, If valuable at all. This is especially true when it comes to email, newsfeeds, and, especially, to social media. Time spent reading less valuable materials is obviously times subtracted from reading the important stuff. If you choose to read a newspaper and pay more attention to the sports section then you do the business section you’re obviously not helping your business knowledge.

Skimming item which appear to have some potential will allow you to either discard the reading material not of importance or to move on to the Scanning and Reading Process.

Read according to the Reading material type.

“The exact number of words per minute is far less important than the fact that this value [The exact number of words per minute] cannot be greatly increased without seriously compromising comprehension.”– Mark Seidenberg

Reading a comic book, or a novel, does not entail same level of complexity nor does it contain as much valuable information as reading a textbook or a business book or even a highly technical manual. So, you can clearly read a work of fiction, like a romance or sci-fi novel or your favorite Fiction genre, much more rapidly without losing comprehension or missing valuable material, which must be comprehended learned and retained, if there really is any. However, if you read nonfiction reading materials at the same speed that you would read your favorite fiction materials you very seriously run the risk of missing valuable information or not comprehending it, or even worse miss comprehending it. You also run a very high risk of not retaining much of it.

Preview The Reading Material/Book

  • If reading nonfiction, apply the rules of scanning before you begin the formal reading process.
  • This will improve your comprehension, and your retention a bit of nonfiction information scanning which applies the principle of reading and re-reading.
  • This will allow you to familiarize yourself with the informations and allow you to comprehend the important information faster more completely and retain more of it.
  • Well, scanning does not involve reading all of it quickly reading the important bits and re-reading it even if you read more quickly than you normally would will allow you to comprehend it faster because you will of seen the important snippets of information more than once and therefore they’re more likely to stick in your brain cells.

Read With intent

  • Eliminate distractions, interruptions, and definitely no multitasking
  • Read the essential portions of the reading materials being sure to reread those item which you have already scanned.
  • Annotate as you go, by highlighting, underlining, adding notes and ideas, so you can quickly come back to the important detail easily.
  • Keep your own notes or write you own summary to reference and or share with others.

Related REFERENCES