Life is Not Fair, and Life is Not Kind, Life is an Opportunity

Life is Not Fair, and Life is Not Kind, Life is an Opportunity
Life is Not Fair, and Life is Not Kind, Life is an Opportunity

— Now Available In Paperback —

Book Description

Life Is Not Fair, and Life Is Not Kind, Life Is An Opportunity by author Albert L. Swope will take you on a journey into believing in not only yourself but also your business ventures.

Unfortunately for us, we grow up in a world where everyone’s success is thrown in our faces across mainstream media and social media. People go from nothing to an overnight success because of a YouTube video or a throwaway comment on social media.

That promotes the idea that success is easy to obtain, and anyone can do it. When you try and fail, it makes success seem even further away and promotes the idea that life isn’t fair.

Inside Life Is Not Fair, and Life Is Not Kind, Life Is An Opportunity you’ll discover:

  • Life is Not Fair
  • Tips for Stopping Your Thought Process
  • Final Practice Tips
  • Life is Not Kind
  • Coping with Unkind Behavior
  • Grabbing Opportunities
  • Steps to Building Confidence
  • Final Tips & Much More!

It’s time to stop blaming life for your failures and seizing the opportunity when it presents itself! Grab a copy of Life Is Not Fair, and Life Is Not Kind, Life Is An Opportunity right now!


Paperback On Amazon

Amazon Author Page

Growing Zucchini And Summer Squash: A Home Gardener’s Guide

Thinking about growing some zucchini and summer squash and are not sure where to get started, well, this book will get you on our way. This concise gardening guide provides the essentials any home gardener will need to grow zucchini and summer squash at home for their tables regardless of how large or small garden patch is or if it just a tiny container garden.  This guide covers topics such which quash to choose, garden considerations, and how to handle the more common pitfalls and problems of growing Zucchini and Summer Squash.

Growing Zucchini And Summer Squash: A HOME GARDENER’S GUIDE ON AMAZON

Amazon Author Page

Poetry – THE STREAM

I know a stream
Than which no lovelier flows.
Its banks a-gleam
With yarrow and wild rose,
Singing it goes
And shining through my dream.

Its waters glide
Beneath the basking noon,
A magic tide
That keeps perpetual June.

There the light sleeps
Unstirred by any storm;
The wild mouse creeps
Through tall weeds hushed and warm;
And the shy snipe,
Alighting unafraid;
With sudden pipe
Awakes the dreaming shade.

So long ago!
Still, still my memory hears
Its silver flow
Across the sundering years,—
Its roses glow,
Ah, through what longing tears!

— Charles G. D. Roberts

Poetry – WHEN THE CLOUD COMES DOWN THE MOUNTAIN

When the cloud comes down the mountain,
And the rain is loud on the leaves,
And the slim flies gather for shelter
Under my cabin eaves,

Then my heart goes out to earth,
With the swollen brook runs free,
Drinks life with the drenched brown roots,
And climbs with the sap in the tree.

— Charles G. D. Roberts

Poetry – A Smile

Let others cheer the winning man,
There’s one I hold worthwhile;
Tis he who does the best he can,
Then loses with a smile.

— anonymous poem, found in The Book o Virtues, ed. by W. J. Bennett

O TO BE AN OSTRICH

O TO BE AN OSTRICH

The ostrich
like Shakespeare
believes there is nothing
good or bad
but thinking
makes it so.

All problems
he has found
by taking his head
out of the ground
and looking
for them.

The solving
obviously
is a matter of foot
going faster than thought
to avoid
being caught.

Such logic
of conscience
may well be envied—
for who can dispute
what can not be questioned
or proved?

— Elizabeth Bartlett

THE POPLAR FIELD

The poplars are fell’d, farewell to the shade
And the whispering sound of the cool colonnade;
The winds play no longer and sing in the leaves,
Nor Ouse on his bosom their image receives.

Twelve years have elapsed since I last took a view
Of my favorite field, and the bank where they grew:
And now in the grass behold they are laid,
And the tree is my seat that once lent me a shade.

The blackbird has fled to another retreat
Where the hazels afford him a screen from the heat;
And the scene where his melody charm’d me before
Resounds with his sweet-flowing ditty no more.

My fugitive years are all hasting away,
And I must ere long lie lowly as they,
With a turf on my breast and a stone at my head,
Ere another such grove shall arise in its stead.

‘Tis a sight to engage me, if anything can,
To muse on the perishing pleasures of man;
Short-lived as we are, our enjoyments, I see,
Have a still shorter date, and die sooner than we.

— W. Cowper